Catholic clergy say assisted dying runs against core values, Islamic leader threatens Muslims who choose it with Hell

By November 12, 2020 Recent News

NewsHub 9 November 2020
Family First Comment: Significant concerns from the Muslim community
“A Facebook post by FIANZ in the lead-up to the referendum identifies nine concerns in regard to the End of Life Choice Act – including that it may disproportionately affect Kiwi Muslims, many of whom are refugees and comparatively poor. “In cases of severe illness where health care costs are high and carers are scarce, members of the community could request euthanasia out of guilt… as a way of relieving the society of their burden,” FIANZ President Ibrar Sheik writes. “Persons in our community who are in extreme pain and clouded by depression, shock and grief could make irrational decisions… not giving themselves time for possible recovery or coming to terms with their condition. “Passing this legislation will be tantamount to saying to our terminally ill and disabled that their lives are less valuable to society than the youthful.””

Many religious Kiwis oppose the End of Life Choice Act for ethical reasons, citing concerns with a perceived lack of reverence for life and its implications for our most vulnerable citizens, while others support it on the grounds it relieves suffering. For Catholics and Muslims, however, the response to the referendum result has been almost unequivocal, as both religions explicitly condemn assisted dying. The Catholic Church issued a ‘Declaration of Euthanasia’ in 1980, condemning the procedure as a crime against both life and God, while a recent letter written by the Vatican’s doctrinal watchdog and endorsed by Pope Francis describes it as “intrinsically evil”. Meanwhile Islamic literature asserts that God decides how long each person lives, and explicitly prohibits planning or knowing one’s time of death in advance.

…’They will dwell in Hell forever’: Islamic leader says Qur’an is clear on euthanasia

One of New Zealand’s most senior Islamic leaders says while Muslims accept the referendum result, they’re disappointed in the country’s decision and will continue to oppose euthanasia. Mustafa Farouk, the executive of the Federation of Islamic Associations of New Zealand (FIANZ), said Muslims have the right to choose euthanasia – but they shouldn’t expect to be honoured at death by their faith community if they do so. In Islam, there are many rituals at the time of death. The deceased is bathed and shrouded in cloth, before receiving the Ṣalāt al-Janāzah – a funeral prayer that seeks pardon for the dead. The body is then buried with the head facing Mecca. Farouk said there still remains an obligation to ensure the deceased is buried if they opt for assisted dying, but indicated they would forfeit an Islamic funeral by doing so, telling Newshub a lot of people simply “would not attend”. “The Qur’an is very clear that we cannot take life – not only take the life of someone, but we can’t even take our own life. If anybody takes their own life, they will dwell in Hell forever. There is no grey area there whatsoever,” he said.

…. A Facebook post by FIANZ in the lead-up to the referendum identifies nine concerns in regard to the End of Life Choice Act – including that it may disproportionately affect Kiwi Muslims, many of whom are refugees and comparatively poor. “In cases of severe illness where health care costs are high and carers are scarce, members of the community could request euthanasia out of guilt… as a way of relieving the society of their burden,” FIANZ President Ibrar Sheik writes. “Persons in our community who are in extreme pain and clouded by depression, shock and grief could make irrational decisions… not giving themselves time for possible recovery or coming to terms with their condition. “Passing this legislation will be tantamount to saying to our terminally ill and disabled that their lives are less valuable to society than the youthful.”

Other religions are split on whether euthanasia is to be avoided or embraced.
For many other Christian denominations – as well as for those who practice Hinduism, Judaism, Jainism or Shinto – there is no consensus on euthanasia.
Some Hindus believe helping end a painful life is a fulfilment of their moral obligation, while for others it’s seen as a disturbance of the natural separation of body and spirit and a threat to the cycle of reincarnation.
READ MORE: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2020/11/euthanasia-referendum-catholic-clergy-say-assisted-dying-runs-against-core-values-islamic-leader-threatens-muslims-who-choose-it-with-hell.amp.html

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