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Say No to Euthanasia in New Zealand

Death-on-demand soars in NZ: 66 people die under new law

By | Recent News

Media Release from #DefendNZ | www.defendnz.co.nz

Death-on-demand soars in NZ: 66 die from new assisted suicide and euthanasia law

The latest insights from the Ministry of Health‘Assisted Dying Service Data and Reporting’ released this week tell of 66 people having been euthanised or assisted to commit suicide in New Zealand up to the 31 March, end of the first quarter of the year, with the ability of the End of Life Choice Act which came into force in on Sunday 7 November 2021.

A total of 206 people have requested to die using the legislation so far.

Applicant processing staff increases 300% due to demand

Registrar for the assisted suicide and euthanasia legislation, Dr Kristin Good, spoke to NZ Doctor magazine about demand to date.

When the law came into force in November 2021, one nurse was employed to answer phonecalls from members of the public enquiring about how to be euthanised or assisted to commit suicide under the End of Life Choice Act.

However, due to increased demand, Dr Good says, “we are now employing a third nurse [answering phone queries].”

Interest remains very high with an average of 46 enquiries each week.

Zero applicants referred for a psychiatric assessment

Of the 206 applicants so far, 168 people had a first assessment with a health practitioner, 126 people had a second, yet 0 people were referred for a psychiatric assessment. This is despite international data showing that 1-in-6 people using assisted suicide are clinically depressed – a condition which, if detected, can be treated.

This raises serious questions for us around the protection of vulnerable people.

#DefendNZ calls for increased public safety when it comes to the End of Life Choice Act.

“There are a number of significant concerns that have already been highlighted in the reporting made available by the Ministry of Health this week. Vulnerable New Zealanders are clearly already being put at risk due to the inferior legislation. We can, and must, do better” says #DefendNZ spokesperson, Henoch Kloosterboer.

Many more deaths possible due to applicants already waiting

Of the total 206 applications, 66 have been euthanised or assisted to commit suicide, 59 are still in process, 11 have withdrawn their application, 40 were denied their application due to not meeting criteria, and 30 had died naturally while their application was in process.

Of the 66 people whose lives have been ended so far, the 73 per cent died at home, 17 per cent in aged care facilities, 6 per cent in DHB facilities and 4 per cent in a hospice facility.

Complaints made – details hidden

So far, according to an interview conducted by NZ Doctor, three formal complaints have been laid.

When #DefendNZ contacted the Ministry of Health for details around complaints last month, we were denied information – even with an Official Information Act request.

#DefendNZ was told by an MOH spokesperson, “I have considered the countervailing public interest in release in making this decision and consider that it does not outweigh the need to withhold at this time.”

We were stonewalled.

Senior Pākehā women with cancer most highly represented

Statistics voluntarily provided by the Ministry of Health show that of the initial 206 applicants:

  • 162 are NZ European/Pākehā (78.6%)
  • 12 are Māori (5.8%)
  • 55% are women compared with 45% male
  • 9 are 18-44 years old (4.4%)
  • 153 are aged 65 years or older (74.3%)
  • 133 have a cancer diagnosis (64.6%)
  • 21 have a neurological condition (10.2%)
  • 38 are recorded as ‘diagnosis not known’ (18.4%)

New Zealand applicants younger than international average

More than 80% of people using euthanasia or assisted suicide internationally are over the age of 65. This means, applicants in New Zealand are already significantly younger than the international average at only 74.3% of those being aged 65 or over. This is concerning, coupled with the unknown and unreported specific ages of those nine people between 18 and 44 years old.

The #DefendNZ movement is calling for much more detailed reporting to remove the cloak of secrecy and increase accountability in its Six to Fix petition.

No required care or support to vulnerable declined applicants

Critics of the legislation have highlighted that the Act does not make any requirements of care towards those whose applications have been declined.

Of the 40 people whose applications have been denied, 16 were not experiencing unbearable suffering unable to be relieved in a tolerable manner, 17 were not in an advanced state of irreversible decline in physical capability, 26 did not suffer from a terminal illness likely to end their lives within six months, and 7 were not competent to make an informed decision.

Note: As a person may be found ineligible for more than one reason, the sums above by reason are greater than the total number of people assessed as ineligible.

These people clearly wanted to die.

Who is supporting them now that they have been declined?

Where is the duty of care to these very vulnerable New Zealanders?

So where to from here?

The next Ministry of Health report for the quarterly period from 1 April to 30 June 2022 is due to be released in July. Based on trajectories, death-on-demand will increase.

Yet we know that of those internationally requesting an assisted suicide or death-by-doctor end to their lives are prone to coercion.

New Zealand has the unenviable ranking of the worst country in the OECD for domestic violence. 1-in-10 elderly in New Zealand suffer abuse, of which the majority is perpetrated by family members, and mostly for financial gain.

We also know 60% are likely to already feel like a burden on loved ones, and the majority list loneliness as one of the primary reasons for requesting death.

We need to get better at supporting each other, and supporting those in our communities at risk of loneliness, elder abuse, depression, and those who feel they are a burden.

Who is in your circle or community that you can reach out to?

#DefendNZ is a movement dedicated to getting a better deal for vulnerable New Zealanders by lobbying to improve the risks created by the current End of Life Choice Act, support those in need, and inform our culture on what’s happening in this conversation.

You might like to read our helpful guides on ‘How do I support someone facing death?’ and ‘What does dying actually look like?’.

If you’re also concerned about the very real risks the End of Life Choice Act has created, visit our Six to Fix petition, which highlights six amendments that can be made to the law to considerably improve public safety.

 

Euthanasia’s slippery slope – already

By | Recent News


Euthanasia has only been legal in New Zealand for less than three months, but already we are seeing some disturbing trends, including the speed with which someone can request and then receive it (despite claims that this was unlikely to happen). And check out the Ministry of Health’s (and Newshub’s) spectacular own goal! For more info on the new law, visit www.Protect.org.nz

Euthanasia & The Risk For Vulnerable Populations

By | Recent News


Euthanasia is now legal in New Zealand. In this episode of “Family Matters”, Bob McCoskrie spoke to Professor David Kissane, an Australian cancer psychiatrist whose career has focused on the interface of mental illness with cancer and palliative care. He is the chair of Palliative Care Research at the University of Notre Dame Australia and the Cunningham Centre for Palliative Care Research at St Vincent’s Sydney, and the Department of Psychiatry, Monash University.

Dr David Kissane talks about the dangers of euthanasia – the way that suffering, undiagnosed depression, unrecognised family distress and communication breakdown creates vulnerability for those with an illness. Dr Kissane also explains the types of vulnerable patients and how a loss of sense of worth, meaning, hope or if you become ashamed can lead to losing the will to live and a desire to end your life. He also warns about the hidden nature of family coercion. Dr Kissane offers advice to medical professionals, and also to families facing this issue with relatives who are facing a terminal illness.

www.Protect.org.nz

More palliative care funding wanted as assisted dying becomes legal

By | Recent News

1News 7 Nov 2021
Palliative care professor Rod MacLeod said despite the Act being called “End of Life Choice”, there would be some people who didn’t have a choice because they couldn’t opt to access palliative care. He said it was a lottery because hospice services rely heavily on charity.  “It depends on where you live, it depends on the disease that you might be experiencing, it depends on your ethnicity sometimes,” he said. “So, I think at the moment, although we have good palliative care services in the country, it’s not evenly distributed in any way.” MacLeod said the Government should boost its funding of the services.
https://www.1news.co.nz/2021/11/07/more-palliative-care-funding-wanted-as-assisted-dying-becomes-legal/

Stuff
Based on overseas experiences, the Ministry of Health estimates up to 950 people could apply for assisted dying each year, with up to 350 being assisted to die. But there is uncertainty about what the actual demand will be.

In Victoria, Oregon, and Canada, assisted dying accounts for between 0.3 and 2 per cent of all deaths; with 124 confirmed assisted deaths in the first 12 months Victoria offered the service.

As of October 27, 96 doctors across the country have expressed interest in being included on the Support and Consultation for End of Life in New Zealand (SCENZ) group list to act as an attending medical practitioner in the assisted dying process. Eight nurse practitioners have put their hand up to be on the list; 13 psychiatrists have expressed their interest to perform assessments if requested; and 93 have expressed interest in independent practitioner second assessments.

The ministry expects assisted dying services will be provided mainly by general practitioners, in a person’s home or other community settings. What impact this will have on an already stretched health workforce is unknown. More than 6000 health professionals have completed the training module available to health workers, and 129 medical and nurse practitioners have accessed training. Sixty-four per cent of practicers happy to be involved are in the North Island, and 36 per cent in the South Island.

In the lead-up to the referendum, close to 1600 doctors signed an open letter opposing assisted dying; arguing proper palliative care makes euthanasia unnecessary. The move to fully fund assisted dying but not palliative care has also come under recent criticism.
https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/euthanasia-debate/300443715/assisted-dying-now-legal-in-new-zealand-end-of-life-choice-act-a-huge-relief-for-some?cid=app-iPhone

Radio NZ
A palliative care doctor who opposes euthanasia says robust information must be collected about why terminally ill people choose to end their lives under the new law. Care Alliance deputy chair Sinead Donnelly said health officials should be asking people who meet the act’s criteria whether they’re choosing euthanasia because of pain, a lack of palliative care options or other reasons. It needs to be asked “if people are choosing euthanasia because, for example, there’s lack of access to palliative care for specific groups in specific regions,” she said. “We’re very concerned about equity at the moment, and Māori and Pasifika, for example, are they choosing euthanasia? … We need to identify if it is due to a lack of access to services.” Donnelly said failing to collect meaningful information could make it harder to recognise issues of access to healthcare.

Last month the government announced the appointment of three experts to monitor assisted dying. They are: medical ethicist Dr Dana Wensley, nursing executive Brenda Close and palliative care consultant Dr Jane Grenville.
https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/455120/end-of-life-choice-act-takes-effect-in-new-zealand

“ANZSPM does not support the legalisation of euthanasia”

By | Recent News

Palliative Medicine Doesn’t Include Euthanasia – ANZSPM

The peak body for palliative medicine in New Zealand and Australia has released an updated Position Statement entitled The Practice of Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide just days before euthanasia and assisted suicide becomes legal in New Zealand.

The Statement by ANZSPM (Australian and New Zealand Society of Palliative Medicine) says that “In accordance with best practice guidelines internationally, the discipline of Palliative Medicine does not include the practices of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide.”

It also unequivocally states that “ANZSPM does not support the legalisation of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide” and “endorses international guidelines reaffirming that these practices are not part of palliative care.”

ANZSPM members are medical practitioners who provide care for people with a life-threatening illness.

It also says that

  • “Patients have the right to refuse life-sustaining treatments including the provision of medically assisted nutrition and/or hydration. Refusing such treatment does not constitute euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide.”
  • “Withholding or withdrawing treatments that are not benefitting the patient, is not euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide.”
  • “Treatment that is appropriately titrated to relieve symptoms and has a secondary and unintended consequence of hastening death, is not euthanasia or physician-assisted suicide.”
  • “Palliative sedation for the management of refractory symptoms is not euthanasia.”

Most people simply want to ensure that the administration of pain relief and the withdrawal of burdensome treatment are not treated as illegal. That is already the case.

The Position Statement also warns that attention should be given to “symptoms that research has highlighted may commonly be associated with a serious and sustained “desire for death” (e.g. depressive disorders and poorly controlled pain).

“Nothing in this new law guarantees the protection required for vulnerable people, including the elderly, depressed or anxious, and those who feel themselves to be a burden or who are under financial pressure. It is also impossible to fully measure levels of coercion on a patient,” says Bob McCoskrie, National Director of Family First NZ.

“It is reassuring for patients and families to know that most Hospices and most palliative care specialists and other medical professionals want nothing to do with euthanasia or assisted suicide.”

 

Open Letter to Totara Hospice re: End of Life Choice Act

By | Recent News

OPEN LETTER

To: Totara Hospice re End of Life Choice Act

We are writing to express our concern that you will be one of the only hospices in New Zealand offering euthanasia and assisted suicide under the new law to come into force on Sunday 7 November. As a loved and trusted service which has served the South Auckland community for 40 years, we respectfully ask that you reconsider your decision in light of the following key points.

We already have “choice”.

A person may already refuse medical treatment.

  • turning off life support
  • ‘do not resuscitate’ (no CPR) requests
  • stopping of treatment or food

 Those things are legal. And they’re not euthanasia.

Most people simply want to ensure that the administration of pain relief and the withdrawal of burdensome treatment are not treated as illegal. Allowing the natural process to take place with appropriate palliative care including pain management is completely different to intentionally bringing about the patient’s death.

Mistakes could be made

Some people will request assisted suicide or euthanasia on account of a diagnosis/prognosis. But as you are aware, there can be no absolute certainty around that. The new law relies on a diagnosis that a person suffers from a terminal illness which is “likely” to end his or her life within six months.

How will you measure “likely”? And can you guarantee that you will be right each and every time. Patients will be relying on that assurance.

Coercion is a significant issue.

Many will request assisted suicide because of coercion either internally or from relatives, or concerns around costs of treatment. Others will be struggling and possibly even be depressed.

The new law is seriously deficient in so far that it only requires doctors to “do their best” to ensure that the person is free from pressure – an extremely low legal threshold. Moreover, it fails to outline any process for ensuring patients are free from coercion. Can you guarantee that every patient who is euthanised will be completely free of coercion.

As the NZ Medical Association told the Select Committee considering the new law: “The provisions in the Bill will not ensure that a decision to seek assisted dying will always be made freely and without subtle coercion.”

In Oregon, Washington state and Canada which already allow euthanasia, the statistics show that the feeling of being a burden is one of the key reasons that terminal patients requested euthanasia.

Also of concern is that elder abuse is already a significant problem in New Zealand. About 80% of it remains hidden and unreported. We cannot ignore the possibility that dependent elderly people may be coerced into assisted suicide in their final weeks and months. That feeling of being a burden on loved ones, and the knowledge of that expensive rest home and geriatric care and medical bills, are all subtle forms of coercion pushing an already vulnerable person towards a quick cheap solution.

Cost may drive decisions

The new law only provides a ‘right’ to one choice – premature death. There is no corresponding right to palliative care. But as you are well aware, good palliative care and hospice services are resource intensive & can be expensive; euthanasia would be cheaper. This law change could introduce a new element of ‘financial calculation’ into decisions about end-of-life care for families and for vulnerable patients.

Our specific law is a flawed and dangerous one

Even a cautious approach from Totara Hospice will not offer complete reassurance to vulnerable patients. These are the specific concerns in the operation of the law:

  • unlike other jurisdictions, no independent witnesses are required at any stage of the process, including at the death
  • the person’s mental competence doesn’t have to be assessed at the time the lethal dose is administered. Can you guarantee that you will know their intention at the time that they are at their most vulnerable?
  • There is no mandatory cooling-off period or ‘thinking time’ – unlike overseas where there are specific cooling off periods of 9 days and up to 15 days.
  • There is no requirement for an existing doctor / patient relationship. As we now know, there are very few medical professionals who want to be part of this process. Patients will ‘shop around’ for the doctor that gives you the answer a patient wants – but who doesn’t know their background – or more importantly, the family dynamics and whether there is obvious coercion going on – which a family doctor will have knowledge of.
  • Once of the worst provisions is that the patient can block family members from being aware of their decision to have euthanasia. There is no requirement that the person discuss their request for assisted suicide with any other person. This is a serious flaw in the Act. But family members may be fully aware of why the request is being made – and may have alternative solutions that don’t involve killing the patient. Are you concerned that you may euthanise patients without any family involvement or support?

How many mistakes?

One of the arguments used for not having the death penalty in NZ was – what if we get one wrong. It was that fear of a mistake that was a good justification for not having the death penalty in law.

How many euthanasia mistakes are we willing to accept? How many euthanasia mistakes are you willing to accept?

Why not?

The most concerning aspect is that “legalised” means normalised.

Euthanasia is no longer illegal and ‘off the table’. It is an actual legal and approved option.

Patients may come to feel euthanasia would be ‘the right thing to do’. They’ve ‘had a good innings’ and do not want to be a ‘burden’ to their nearest and dearest. They don’t want to be a drain on their family’s resources and time.

This law now means that vulnerable people facing a terminal illness will be asking themselves – why should I not be accessing euthanasia / assisted suicide?

And this underlying obligation will be felt even greater when they utilise the services of Totara Hospice.

It’s now a clear option on the table at Totara Hospice – sadly.

We believe patients facing death have a fundamental human right – a right to receive the very best palliative care, love and support that we can give to alleviate what they may be naturally scared of, surrounded and supported by loved ones,

Hospice NZ defines Palliative Care as “active total care… [F]or people whose illness is no longer curable, the goal is around providing quality of life, managing pain and symptoms to enable people to live every moment in whatever way is important to them.”

We ask the Totara Hospice to take euthanasia / assisted suicide off the table.

Assisting suicide at a hospice is never an appropriate solution.

Auckland hospice prepares for assisted dying

By | Latest News, Recent News

On TVNZ Q&A over the weekend, they featured the euthanasia issue which comes into law in a week. But rather than speaking to both sides of the debate – oh no – they just sought out the one and only one Hospice in the whole of New Zealand that was allowing assisted suicide on their premises. That’s what TVNZ call ‘balance’ 🙁

The head of the Hospice said “We believe that each of our patients is a unique human being, a unique individual, and as such they should be free to make the choices that are fight for them because we deliver patient-centred care where our approach is that the patient is always the driver of their own journey, we don’t conscientiously object.”

https://www.1news.co.nz/2021/10/30/auckland-hospice-prepares-for-assisted-dying/

But what if the patient is not free to choose? What if there is coercion? What if the patient is vulnerable and simply needs reassurance and support?

Here’s the definition of PALLIATIVE CARE which Hospice NZ uses. It is

active total care… for people whose illness is no longer curable, the goal is around providing quality of life, managing pain and symptoms to enable people to live every moment in whatever way is important to them.”

Killing a patient doesn’t fit that definition.

Learn more about the law here …

Assisted dying services to be ‘limited’

By | Recent News

Assisted dying services to be ‘limited’ when legalised, legal action expected
Stuff co.nz 3 August 2021
Family First Comment: Good. People can live without it.
But this is disturbing…
“The briefing paper, provided to the health minister by Director-General of Health Dr Ashley Bloomfield in January, showed there remained numerous unresolved questions and risks surround assisted dying services.”

Assisted dying services for the terminally ill will be “limited” when the End of Life Choice Act comes into force in November, and health officials say legal action over the law is “almost certain”.

Ministry of Health officials have highlighted “complex and sensitive elements” to the End of Life Choice Act and incoming assisted dying regime in a briefing paper to Health Minister Andrew Little, obtained under the Official Information Act.

Among the issues canvassed in the briefing: “uncertainty” over how many people will seek assisted death, terminally ill patients having to travel for services when the law comes into effect, competing pressures in the health system, and a possible need to rewrite parts of the law to resolve “legislative issues”.

The Ministry of Health moved forward on enacting the End of Life Choice Act on Monday, appointing 11 medical experts to a statutory body, Support and Consultation for End of Life in New Zealand (SCENZ), that will manage the incoming assisted dying regime.

Under the law, which the country voted to be passed in a referendum at the 2020 election, SCENZ will develop and oversee the standards for terminally ill patients should receive when they seek an assisted death.

The ministry said in a statement that planning for the November 7 deadline to implement the End of Life Choice Act was “well underway”.

The briefing paper, provided to the health minister by Director-General of Health Dr Ashley Bloomfield in January, showed there remained numerous unresolved questions and risks surround assisted dying services.
READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/politics/125945156/assisted-dying-services-to-be-limited-when-legalised-legal-action-expected?cid=app-iPhone

Euthanasia: Are we ready for legalised assisted dying in New Zealand?

By | Recent News

NZ Herald 1 May 2021
Family First Comment: We never will be – because its fundamentally unsafe. But here are additional concerns:
* We lack clarity around how health practitioner training will roll out, who or how many will take part, how training will be funded, or what support will be available.
* Questions are also being raised about how a doctor can detect coercion.
* Concerns have been raised about whether NZ will follow in Victoria, Australia’s footsteps (where assisted dying became legal in 2019) and limit training to a six-hour online tutorial.
* Only 10% of the almost 2000 health practitioners who responded indicated definite willingness to be involved. Another 20% indicated it was a ‘possibility’.
* there needs to be equal support and input into palliative care, so people have options.
* New Zealand universities still need to increase palliative care education for medical students.

Last year almost two-thirds of New Zealanders voted to legalise assisted dying. So come November 7, euthanasia will be legal. The Ministry of Health expects about 1100 people to request it in the first year and about a third to follow through.

But plenty of questions remain about whether the processes and infrastructure will be in place for it to happen.

Six months out, the ministry that is responsible for implementing the End of Life Choice Act and making any regulations is still in the process of appointing people to the three statutory positions to oversee the regime.

We lack clarity around how health practitioner training will roll out, who or how many will take part, how training will be funded, or what support will be available. People are already asking health practitioners and advocacy groups for guidance and advice, but nobody is any closer to being able to provide answers.

Despite the criticisms, Health Minister Andrew Little says the ministry has assured him everything will be ready and he’s holding them to that.

“They’re giving me regular updates … I’m very confident things will be in place,” he told the Weekend Herald.

So what needs to happen to reassure patients, medical practitioners and safety watchdogs that euthanasia will be fair and safe? Here are some of the main concerns and the state of play so far.
READ MORE: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/euthanasia-are-we-ready-for-legalised-assisted-dying-in-new-zealand/L2DFV5ZKWPDYVAXVLD5NPS4O5M/

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Only 10 percent of health workers ‘definitely willing’ to carry out euthanasia – survey

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Radio NZ News 22 April 2021
Family First Comment: No surprises in this. It’s a bit like very few doctors wanting to perform abortions. Medical professionals never entered the profession to kill people.
“The demand for assisted dying will have to be met by a workforce overwhelmingly opposed to being involved and a health system some doctors say is already struggling with a lack of resources. Only 10% of health practitioners described themselves as “definitely willing” to provide assisted dying with a further 20% saying they are “possibly willing,” according to a Ministry of Health workforce survey.”

More than a 1000 people are expected to request to end their lives in the first year of New Zealand’s assisted dying regime.

Chief medical officer Andrew Connolly said the Ministry of Health was expecting about 1100 patients to make the request, although it was predicting only about a third of those would carry through with euthanasia.

The demand for assisted dying will have to be met by a workforce overwhelmingly opposed to being involved and a health system some doctors say is already struggling with a lack of resources.

Only 10 percent of health practitioners described themselves as “definitely willing” to provide assisted dying with a further 20 percent saying they are “possibly willing,” according to a Ministry of Health workforce survey.

The lack of doctors willing to carry out assisted dying may lead to those doctors who are willing to have to travel the country administering euthanasia if the service is not available in all areas.

Connolly said having a ready and willing workforce was the biggest challenge to setting up the assisted dying regime, which comes in on 7 November.

The Ministry of Health initially said its survey of nearly 2000 health practitioners showed 30 percent were definitely or possibly willing – a number the Minister of Health Andrew Little said gave him confidence the workforce to deliver euthanasia would be available.

But the breakdown now provided to RNZ describes a less enthusiastic workforce, with just 10 percent saying they were “definitely” willing and a further 20 percent saying they were “possibly” willing.
READ MORE: https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/in-depth/440976/only-10-percent-of-health-workers-definitely-willing-to-carry-out-euthanasia-survey
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Distressing death warning for ‘unregulated’ euthanasia drugs

By | Recent News

Radio NZ News 20 April 2021
Family First Comment: Here comes a flawed dangerous regime with unintended adverse consequences (which the public weren’t fully informed about)…
“There have been concerns expressed internationally over … the concoction of medication that is used, that in some cases, has led to traumatic end of life experiences,” 

Patients requesting euthanasia will be given unapproved, unregulated and “off label” medicines, sparking warnings of prolonged and distressing deaths.

People who chose to swallow or ingest the fatal medicines, rather than taking them intravenously, would be given drugs that were compounded (mixed up) by a pharmacist and provided to the patient without being approved by regulator Medsafe.

The Ministry of Health said those who opted for an injection would be given drugs which had been approved by Medsafe but for a different purpose – so the medicines will be provided for an unapproved, or “off label”, use.

Hundreds of pages of documentation, much of it heavily redacted, has been released under the Official Information Act to RNZ as part of an investigation into how prepared New Zealand is to introduce assisted dying.

Among the documents is an email from Dr Bryan Betty, medical director at the Royal New Zealand College of GPs, warning that mixing concoctions of drugs had led to traumatic deaths.

Dr Betty’s warning to the Ministry of Health used the example of American states not being able to access death penalty drugs due to cost and availability.

“So they made up their own concoctions initially, with examples of prolonged processes until fine-tuned. Belgium had a standard process but (this was) not used by many doctors for some years, also resulting in prolonged, distressing deaths.”

Betty said it was important to develop strong guidelines to avoid these situations.

“There have been concerns expressed internationally over … the concoction of medication that is used, that in some cases, has led to traumatic end of life experiences,” he said.

“I think we need to mitigate those risks upfront and be very prescriptive about what could be used and an end of life situation,” he said.
READ MORE: https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/in-depth/440824/distressing-death-warning-for-unregulated-euthanasia-drugs
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Government agrees people with mental illness should have access to euthanasia (Canada)

By | Recent News, Videos

The Canadian Press 23 February 2021
Family First Comment: No slippery slope?
Dream on.

The Trudeau government has agreed with the Senate that Canadians suffering solely from grievous and irremediable mental illnesses should be entitled to receive medical assistance in dying — but not for another two years.

The two-year interlude is six months longer than what was proposed by senators.

It is one of a number of changes to Bill C-7 proposed by the government in response to amendments approved last week by the Senate.

The government has rejected another Senate amendment that would have allowed people who fear being diagnosed with dementia or other cognitive-impairing conditions to make advance requests for an assisted death.

It has also rejected one other amendment and modified two others in a motion that was debated Tuesday in the House of Commons.

Justice Minister David Lametti told the Commons he believes the response to the Senate amendments is “fair and realistic.”
READ MORE: https://www.msn.com/en-ca/news/canada/government-agrees-people-with-mental-illness-should-have-access-to-maid-%E2%80%94-in-2-years/ar-BB1dW37m

This is video three of a series of messages directed at jurisdictions debating the legalization of euthanasia and assisted suicide. Consider Canada’s experience.

Alex Schadenberg, Executive Director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, speaks about the Truchon decision (2019) and Bill C-7 (passed into law on March 17, 2021) and how they changed the euthanasia law.

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Euthanasia: What happens if the drugs don’t work?

By | Recent News

Radio NZ News 30 March 2021
Family First Comment: This is the danger of putting politicians in charge of a medical issue….
Palliative care professor Rod MacLeod said ending a life was not always a simple matter. “I think the public has this idea that assisted dying is quite clear cut – you take the drugs and you’re dead. But death doesn’t necessarily follow within minutes or even hours, it can take a lot longer and well documented cases of stuff not working.”

What happens if a patient doesn’t die during a euthanasia attempt? That’s one of a number of ethical and legal questions being asked by palliative care experts who say we are woefully unprepared to introduce assisted dying.

Senior nursing leaders are also concerned New Zealand won’t be ready when the law takes effect on 7 November.

The nurses union said its request for legal advice had been ignored by the Ministry of Health and nurses fear they could face disciplinary action and be struck off if they go too far discussing euthanasia with a patient.

Palliative care professor Rod MacLeod said ending a life was not always a simple matter.

“I think the public has this idea that assisted dying is quite clear cut – you take the drugs and you’re dead,” MacLeod said.

“But death doesn’t necessarily follow within minutes or even hours, it can take a lot longer and well documented cases of stuff not working.”

It was not yet known which drugs would be used for euthanasia in New Zealand and under the law it would be an offence punishable by a fine of up to $20,000 to reveal the method by which the drugs were administered to the patient.

“You assume that it’s the same as the United States [which] uses for lethal injections for the death penalty,” MacLeod said.

“We know that doesn’t always work. It’s not always that comfortable. It’s not like flicking a switch.”
READ MORE: https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/in-depth/439441/euthanasia-what-happens-if-the-drugs-don-t-work
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Fears euthanasia training will just be online course

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Radio NZ News 29 March 2021
Family First Comment: “Palliative care specialists fear health practitioners with as little as six hours online training could end up providing euthanasia for patients who would have wanted to live if they had proper care and pain relief. And a new Ministry of Health survey reveals fewer than a third of health practitioners are prepared to participate in the assisted dying regime.”
Euthanasia. Not needed. Not safe. Not supported.

Palliative care specialists fear health practitioners with as little as six hours online training could end up providing euthanasia for patients who would have wanted to live if they had proper care and pain relief.

Their concerns come as a new Ministry of Health survey reveals fewer than a third of health practitioners are prepared to participate in the assisted dying regime.

Palliative care specialists say that might mean euthanasia is unavailable in some areas and a small band of itinerant doctors with no connection to their patients may do the bulk of the cases.

Palliative Care professor Rod MacLeod said nearly every week that he spent working in hospice care he was approached by someone who wanted to end their life – but during his 32-year career all but one of those people changed their minds.

“I’ve had lots and lots of people ask me for assisted dying. But with palliative care provided those requests melt away.”

He said that meant that under the euthanasia regime people who would have changed their minds could be put to death.

Palliative care specialists say most people skilled in end of life care don’t want to be involved in euthanasia.

But a Ministry of Health survey of nearly 2000 health practitioners shows that, while almost half supported assisted dying in principle, fewer than 30 percent were “possibly or definitely” willing to provide the service.
READ MORE: https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/439361/fears-euthanasia-training-will-just-be-online-course

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Med students become more opposed to euthanasia while at uni

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Stuff co.nz 15 March 2021
Family First Comment: No surprises in this trend…
Support for euthanasia fell over each year of medical training: 64% in support in second year plummeting to 39% in fifth year.
“Ending a life was “contrary” to what med students were trying to become… Their whole orientation is to try and make things better, and ending a person’s life doesn’t feel that way.”
Exactly.

Medical students become more opposed to euthanasia as they progress through medical school, a new study has found.

Almost 65 per cent of second year medical students at Otago University supported euthanasia or assisted dying, compared with 39 per cent in fifth year, the researchers found.

Support for the practice fell over each year of training: 64.8 per cent in support in second year, 62.6 per cent in third year, 51.5 per cent in fourth year and 39.1 per cent in fifth year.

“We suggest that this difference is most likely due to their time in medical education,” concluded Luke Nie​ and Simon Walker​, along with two other Otago researchers.

First and second year students see few patients and their views mirrored the results of the End of Life Choice referendum held last November – 65 per cent in favour of legalisation, 34 per cent opposed.

By fifth year, however, med students are seeing lots of patients and are “confronted… by the complexities” that can come up in end-of-life situations, he said.

Otago med students are taught palliative medicine and end-of-life care as a “vertical module” throughout most of their education. They also get bioethics courses, although those are mostly identifying issues and enabling students to think for themselves, Walker said. He is a bioethicist and teaches some of these neutral classes.

Professors, doctors and nurses with strong views on euthanasia also probably made impressions on the students, he said.
READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/science/124506016/med-students-become-more-opposed-to-euthanasia-while-at-uni

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Belgian euthanasia study – Legal requirements are undermined or ignored

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Euthanasia Prevention Coalition –  5 February 2021 – Alex Schadenberg
Family First Comment: Belgium’s experience warns us of what is likely to happen here:
“The study points out that there is a yearly increase in the number of euthanasia deaths, but the number of actual euthanasia deaths is unknown due to high percentage of unreported euthanasia deaths… Euthanasia has become more common for people over the age of 80 who live in nursing homes.… All people should be concerned about how the legal requirements of the euthanasia law that are intended to operate as safeguards and procedural guarantees in reality often fail to operate.”
Disturbing.

A study by Belgian researchers and published in the Journal of Medicine and Philosophy on January 25, 2021, examines the practise of euthanasia in Belgium and concludes that legal requirements are being undermined and safeguards ignored. The study concludes that:

there are shortcomings in the Belgian euthanasia law, the application of that law, and the monitoring of euthanasia practice. This leads us to conclude that several of these shortcomings are structural and thus require more than simply increased oversight.

The study was conducted by Kasper Raus, Bert Vanderhaegen and Sigrid Sterckx from Ghent University and examines the official Belgian euthanasia data within the context of other studies that examine the application of the Belgian euthanasia law. This study is done by Belgian researchers who have been examining the Belgian euthanasia data for many years. One may disagree with the conclusion of the study but the data is impeccable.

Looking at key issues.
The study points out that since euthanasia was legalized in 2002 in Belgium, the debate on the issue has continued. There has been several legislative proposals to change the law since 2002. The study states:

All but two proposed amendments were voted down. The Euthanasia Law was first amended in 2005 to provide legal protection for pharmacists dispensing the lethal medication for the performance of euthanasia (Law of 10 November 2005). In 2014, the Euthanasia Law was amended again, this time to allow euthanasia for minors who are judged to have “capacity for discernment,” without setting an age limit (Law of 28 February 2014).

The study points out that there is a yearly increase in the number of euthanasia deaths, but the number of actual euthanasia deaths is unknown due to high percentage of unreported euthanasia deaths.
READ MORE: http://alexschadenberg.blogspot.com/2021/02/study-belgian-euthanasia-law-is-out-of.html
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Justice minister defends assisted dying bill from critics as Senate committee starts hearings

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National Post 24 November 2020
Family First Comment: Apparently, there is no slippery slope – or so we are told.
Better rethink that one!
“[Canada’s Justice Minister David] Lametti also said he hopes the medical assistance in dying (MAID) regime will eventually be further expanded to people who are suffering solely from mental illness”

Justice Minister David Lametti told a Senate committee on Monday that he’s heard the fierce criticism of the government’s new assisted dying bill, which expands the regime to include people who don’t have a terminal illness.

The critics include disability rights organizations, palliative care experts, and even Jody Wilson-Raybould — the former justice minister who introduced the original assisted dying bill in 2016.

But Lametti said he believes the government has found the right balance in respecting the dignity of people with disabilities, and also their right to end their life if their suffering is too great.

Lametti also said he hopes the medical assistance in dying (MAID) regime will eventually be further expanded to people who are suffering solely from mental illness, but the government doesn’t have enough time to do it before a court-ordered deadline of Dec. 18 for this bill to pass.

Bill C-7 was introduced in response to a Quebec Superior Court ruling that found the original law, passed in 2016, unconstitutionally restricted MAID to those whose death was “reasonably foreseeable” — in other words, to patients with a terminal illness.

The bill creates a new MAID eligibility requirement for people who are deeply suffering, but who are not expected to die from their illness.
READ MORE: https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/justice-minister-defends-assisted-dying-bill-from-critics-as-senate-committee-starts-hearings
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Catholic clergy say assisted dying runs against core values, Islamic leader threatens Muslims who choose it with Hell

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NewsHub 9 November 2020
Family First Comment: Significant concerns from the Muslim community
“A Facebook post by FIANZ in the lead-up to the referendum identifies nine concerns in regard to the End of Life Choice Act – including that it may disproportionately affect Kiwi Muslims, many of whom are refugees and comparatively poor. “In cases of severe illness where health care costs are high and carers are scarce, members of the community could request euthanasia out of guilt… as a way of relieving the society of their burden,” FIANZ President Ibrar Sheik writes. “Persons in our community who are in extreme pain and clouded by depression, shock and grief could make irrational decisions… not giving themselves time for possible recovery or coming to terms with their condition. “Passing this legislation will be tantamount to saying to our terminally ill and disabled that their lives are less valuable to society than the youthful.””

Many religious Kiwis oppose the End of Life Choice Act for ethical reasons, citing concerns with a perceived lack of reverence for life and its implications for our most vulnerable citizens, while others support it on the grounds it relieves suffering. For Catholics and Muslims, however, the response to the referendum result has been almost unequivocal, as both religions explicitly condemn assisted dying. The Catholic Church issued a ‘Declaration of Euthanasia’ in 1980, condemning the procedure as a crime against both life and God, while a recent letter written by the Vatican’s doctrinal watchdog and endorsed by Pope Francis describes it as “intrinsically evil”. Meanwhile Islamic literature asserts that God decides how long each person lives, and explicitly prohibits planning or knowing one’s time of death in advance.

…’They will dwell in Hell forever’: Islamic leader says Qur’an is clear on euthanasia

One of New Zealand’s most senior Islamic leaders says while Muslims accept the referendum result, they’re disappointed in the country’s decision and will continue to oppose euthanasia. Mustafa Farouk, the executive of the Federation of Islamic Associations of New Zealand (FIANZ), said Muslims have the right to choose euthanasia – but they shouldn’t expect to be honoured at death by their faith community if they do so. In Islam, there are many rituals at the time of death. The deceased is bathed and shrouded in cloth, before receiving the Ṣalāt al-Janāzah – a funeral prayer that seeks pardon for the dead. The body is then buried with the head facing Mecca. Farouk said there still remains an obligation to ensure the deceased is buried if they opt for assisted dying, but indicated they would forfeit an Islamic funeral by doing so, telling Newshub a lot of people simply “would not attend”. “The Qur’an is very clear that we cannot take life – not only take the life of someone, but we can’t even take our own life. If anybody takes their own life, they will dwell in Hell forever. There is no grey area there whatsoever,” he said.

…. A Facebook post by FIANZ in the lead-up to the referendum identifies nine concerns in regard to the End of Life Choice Act – including that it may disproportionately affect Kiwi Muslims, many of whom are refugees and comparatively poor. “In cases of severe illness where health care costs are high and carers are scarce, members of the community could request euthanasia out of guilt… as a way of relieving the society of their burden,” FIANZ President Ibrar Sheik writes. “Persons in our community who are in extreme pain and clouded by depression, shock and grief could make irrational decisions… not giving themselves time for possible recovery or coming to terms with their condition. “Passing this legislation will be tantamount to saying to our terminally ill and disabled that their lives are less valuable to society than the youthful.”

Other religions are split on whether euthanasia is to be avoided or embraced.
For many other Christian denominations – as well as for those who practice Hinduism, Judaism, Jainism or Shinto – there is no consensus on euthanasia.
Some Hindus believe helping end a painful life is a fulfilment of their moral obligation, while for others it’s seen as a disturbance of the natural separation of body and spirit and a threat to the cycle of reincarnation.
READ MORE: https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/new-zealand/2020/11/euthanasia-referendum-catholic-clergy-say-assisted-dying-runs-against-core-values-islamic-leader-threatens-muslims-who-choose-it-with-hell.amp.html

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Referendum results live: NZ votes yes on euthanasia

By | Recent News

NZ Herald 30 October 2020
ACT leader David Seymour thanked MPs for supporting the End of Life Choice Bill through Parliament.

He also thanked Dame Jenny Gibbs for “giving me the courage as a young MP to pursue this cause”, Brooke van Velden for her work in rallying support in Parliament for the bill, and National MP Chris Bishop.

He said New Zealand would be “a kinder, more compassionate, more humane society – what a great day to be a Kiwi”.

David Seymour hosted an event at Parliament from 1pm that heard from Shirley Seales and, via Skype from New York, Matt Vickers – the mother and widowed husband of euthanasia campaigner Lecretia Seales.

Shirley Seales gave an emotional speech acknowledging her daughter’s legacy.

“I’m sure [Lecretia] would never have imagined that she would still be acknowledged for the part she has played. She would be very humbled and I know she would want others acknowledged.”

She paid tribute to Matt Vickers, several lawyers who advocated for the cause, and MPs including Seymour, Maryan Street and Michael Laws.

She said it had been “particularly upsetting to hear lies about Lecretia throughout the campaign”.

“I have been tempted to respond, but my greatest reward will be a majority vote. We are extremely proud of Lecretia, and I’m sure she is smiling down on us all.”

Today’s result marks the end of the five-year journey for Seymour since he first put the End of Life Choice Bill in the ballot.

The referendum is binding and the majority “yes” vote will see it become law, with terminal patients able to request assisted dying from November 6 next year.
READ MORE: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/politics/referendum-results-live-nz-votes-yes-on-euthanasia-no-on-cannabis-legalisation/LBKXYT2QB5IZLLCZJ7EVM6D4SY/

‘The devil is in the detail’: Salvation Army concerned over loopholes in euthanasia legislation
Radio NZ News 31 October 2020
Vulnerable at risk
Family First say the success of the assisted dying bill will put some vulnerable people at risk. Spokesperson Bob McCoskrie said support for the law change lowered as the debate went on.

He said many people did not realise there is an amount of choice people have in their latter days, such as turning off life support, refusing treatment, upping pain management, and do -not-resuscitate orders.

Meanwhile, a top QC said the law legalising euthanasia is shrouded in so much secrecy it will be difficult to know if anyone has been pressured into ending their life.

Auckland barrister Grant Illingworth said two doctors must sign off on someone’s request to die, but there is no requirement for them to ensure that the person has not been pressured.

“The processes under the act are shrouded in confidentiality and secrecy so nobody is ever really going to know whether people have been bullied or pressured or whether something has gone wrong in the process.

“It’s a confidential process, it’s surrounded by secrecy so how do we know?”

He said the regulations fail to require doctors to satisfy themselves there’s no coercion of a patient.

The chair of Risky Law New Zealand said the law will compromise the capacity of doctors to show undivided care and compassion to patients.

Dr Peter Thirkell said the lack of safeguards remains a big concern, particularly where patients already feel a burden to others.

The group is calling on the government to fully fund palliative and hospice services so that intentionally killing some people in vulnerable circumstances becomes unnecessary.
READ MORE: https://www.rnz.co.nz/news/national/429542/the-devil-is-in-the-detail-salvation-army-concerned-over-loopholes-in-euthanasia-legislation

Referendum results: ‘Sad and dangerous’ day, say opponents to End of Life Choice Act
Stuff co.nz 30 October 2020
Family First national director Bob McCoskrie said some would be euthanised without a definitive prognosis. Others would request “assisted suicide” as a result of coercion, or because they could not afford treatment.

“Others will be struggling because of a terminal disease prognosis and actually just need appropriate support.

“This law now means that vulnerable people facing a terminal illness will be asking themselves – why should I not be accessing euthanasia?”

Opponents to the Act said there were already calls for it to be extended from pro-euthanasia advocates.

Many New Zealanders did not understand what they were voting for, and the outcome was based on misinformation and confusion, Euthanasia-Free NZ spokesman Renee Joubert said.

Polling during the voting period showed 80 per cent of New Zealand adults misunderstood what the End of Life Choice Act would legalise.

Only 20 per cent of respondents understood the Act would not make it legal to turn off machines that were keeping people alive – that was already legal.

“It’s disappointing that the New Zealand public were generally uninformed about the details of the End of Life Choice Act.”

Joubert said the group would continue to lobby against any extension to the law.
READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/euthanasia-debate/123245906/referendum-results-sad-and-dangerous-day-say-opponents-to-end-of-life-choice-act

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Huhana Hickey: I’m pro-choice – but I oppose the End of Life Choice Act.

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Where are the safeguards for Māori and the disabled in end of life law?
Stuff co.nz 1 November 2020
Family First Comment: I am a disabled Māori woman who lives with pain 24/7. That pain will progressively increase as I live on, and so I am very aware of the disparities that exist in our health and disability system.
I am also aware of how poverty and a lack of access to good medical interventions, such as the expensive cost of accessing medicinal cannabis, thanks to an inept Pharmac, lead to choices of desperation rather than a choice of free will.

OPINION: In 12 months assisted dying will be legal as, unsurprisingly, the mainstream demographic has predictably spoken with a 65.2 per cent yes vote in the preliminary results.

Congratulations to those who have had their wish granted and commiserations to those who haven’t. Whilst I am myself pro-choice, I remain opposed to this law for two reasons – those being the risk to indigenous people and the disabled, as evidenced by international research in countries where it is legal.

I am a disabled Māori woman who lives with pain 24/7. That pain will progressively increase as I live on, and so I am very aware of the disparities that exist in our health and disability system.

I am also aware of how poverty and a lack of access to good medical interventions, such as the expensive cost of accessing medicinal cannabis, thanks to an inept Pharmac, lead to choices of desperation rather than a choice of free will.

There are also issues with defining terminal and many, it seems, wrongly assume disabled won’t be affected without realising many disabilities by their very nature are terminal.

Therefore, trying to stop the voices of our disabled has led to some incorrect assumptions and misunderstanding as to why many of us have spoken out against THIS particular act.

It is poorly drafted and lacks safety mechanisms.
READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/euthanasia-debate/300146508/where-are-the-safeguards-for-mori-and-the-disabled-in-end-of-life-law?cid=app-iPhone

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