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Doctors face jail after ‘diagnosing woman with autism so she could get lethal injection’

By | Recent News

NZ Herald 26 November 2018
Family First Comment: So much for ‘safeguards’. You can’t undo ‘killed’!
#rejectassistedsuicide
www.protect.org.nz

Three doctors who certified a woman as autistic so that she could die by euthanasia are set to go on trial in Belgium.

The sisters of Tine Nys told investigators that her suffering was caused instead by a broken heart after a failed relationship, and that she had falsely claimed to be autistic to two doctors and a psychiatrist.

She had told them her suffering was “unbearable and incurable” so that she could qualify for euthanasia under Belgian law, the Daily Mail reports.

Nys was given a lethal injection in April 2010, just two months after her diagnosis of autism, and died aged 38. Her sisters and her parents were at her bedside.

Campaigners in the UK say the case highlights the dangers of introducing euthanasia here.

Nys’s family claims that the law was broken because she was never treated for autism and so it had not been established that she was suffering unbearably and incurably – the key criteria for a mercy killing to go ahead.

The three doctors have been charged with failing to comply with the legal conditions for euthanasia and poisoning. If found guilty they are almost certain to face jail.
READ MORE: https://www.nzherald.co.nz/lifestyle/news/article.cfm?c_id=6&objectid=12166390

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How liberal is Simon Bridges really?

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NewsHub 19 November 2018
Family First Comment:  If being ‘conservative’ means being against drugs and for life, then be 100% ‘conservative’, Simon.
www.ChooseLife.nz
www.SayNopeToDope.nz 
www.RejectAssistedSuicide.nz 

On Monday morning AM Show host Duncan Garner quizzed the 42-year-old on a few thorny topics currently before Parliament.

Euthanasia
The End of Life Choice Bill from ACT leader David Seymour is currently in select committee after passing its first reading in November last year. Mr Seymour says it will allow eligible people to “end their lives in peace and dignity, surrounded by loved ones”.

Mr Bridges voted against the Bill even being read, but didn’t vote on whether it should go to select committee. When it comes up for its second reading, Mr Bridges says he’s “likely to vote against it”.
“It’s simply because I do believe life’s important,” he told Garner.

“What’s also true is I’ve looked around and I’ve seen research on what’s happened in other parts of the world, and it is a bit of a thin edge of the wedge in my view. That is you start narrow, but you see people who perhaps aren’t at that very serious end of pain and suffering and illness receiving it, and I worry about that.”

Different forms of euthanasia and assisted suicide are legal in various European countries and US states, Canada, Japan and Colombia.
https://www.newshub.co.nz/home/politics/2018/11/how-liberal-is-simon-bridges-really.html

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Michigan doctor with cancer planned own death, ‘shocked’ to be alive

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Detroit Free Press 21 October 2018
Family First Comment:  “Randy Hillard has travelled more in the past eight years than he has his entire life. South America. Dubai. Singapore. Sydney. But if he went through with his plan to go to Switzerland in 2010, those trips wouldn’t have happened. That’s because eight years ago, Hillard was determined to kill himself through an assisted-suicide organization overseas.” 
#rejectassistedsuicide 
www.protect.org.nz

Randy Hillard has traveled more in the past eight years than he has his entire life.

South America. Dubai. Singapore. Sydney.

But if he went through with his plan to go to Switzerland in 2010, those trips wouldn’t have happened. That’s because eight years ago, Hillard was determined to kill himself through an assisted-suicide organization overseas.

He was diagnosed with stage 4 stomach cancer just a few months before he went on a quest to kill himself. He suddenly realized he had become obsessive when he began planning his funeral.

“It was one rather pathetic way of asserting some control over my life,” said Hillard. “Cancer was going to kill me, and I did not intend to die yet.”

Hillard abandoned the idea after he heard about a drug called Herceptin. His oncologist at University of Michigan’s Rogel Cancer Center suggested he give it a try.

Back in 2010, the drug had just recently been approved for stomach cancer patients and promised a slightly longer life expectancy — 11 to 13 months longer. It was a long shot: Only 20 percent of cancer patients have the HER-2 protein surrounding the cancer cell targeted by the drug.

Hillard’s metastatic tumors had that specific protein. And eight years later, it still puzzles him … well, the statistics do. Stomach cancer at his stage has an 18-percent survival rate, and, not to mention, is one of the most uncommon cancers in America.

“I wake up every day shocked at how non-dead I am,” he said.
https://www.freep.com/story/life/2018/10/21/stage-4-stomach-cancer-randy-hillard-michigan/1674173002/

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Misdiagnosed: A cancer survivor shares her extraordinary tale

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NZ Herald 22 September 2018
Family First Comment: Just as well euthanasia isn’t available …. yet! A classic example of why we should say #rejectassistedsuicide
www.protect.org.nz

On June 10 2017, Killarney Jeffares’ life flashed before her eyes.

The words, “there’s nothing we can do” echoed around her brain and she was quickly moved into palliative care.

Wills were finalised, family were present and funeral plans were put into motion. Her death was imminent.

It had been six months since she was diagnosed with rectal cancer, but an operation found it had spread.

“I knew something was wrong because it was supposed to be a seven-hour surgery and I was out after two hours,” Jeffares said.

“It was horrific. We were mourning. My children from Australia came over to visit me and we started our grieving process.”

Her husband Robert was and still is the only person who was told by the surgeon the rough timeframe of how long his wife would live for.

“It really hit home,” he said. “I won’t tell anyone. That’s one man’s opinion.”

But four days later, she was told there had been a mistake. Her samples had come back she was told she actually had ovarian cancer and all hope was not lost.

“We can never get that time back. It was quite traumatic for all of us going through that process, so we were just speechless when they told us ‘oh no, we’ve got that wrong’, she said.
https://www.nzherald.co.nz/index.cfm?objectid=12121907&ref=twitter

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Forum On The Family 2018: Dr John Fox

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Dr John Fox has a PhD in English Literature from the University of Auckland. He has been an academic, worked in family and community restoration, public policy, and children’s and youth work. He is the uncle and brother of adopted children, a son, a disabled person with spastic hemiplegia, a human being, and an Anglican seminarian. He specialises in good coffee, teaching adults to read, music, and slow food.

As a representative of ELEVATE Christian Disability Trust, he shares his powerful Oral Submission made against David Seymour’s End of Life Choice Bill.

Helpful or harmful: euthanasia debate comes to Manawatū

By | Recent News

Stuff co.nz 23 August 2018
Family First Comment: The Select Committee are hearing the message loud and clear – reject assisted suicide. Reject Seymour’s bill.
www.Protect.org.nz

A Manawatū union organiser says proposed euthanasia legislation could force older, sick or mentally ill people into feeling pressured to end their lives.

Dion Martin, of Palmerston North, says the controversial End of Life Choice Bill, with its provision for “assisted dying”, is really about “dressed-up suicide”.

Martin has worked as a union organiser for 29 years and has witnessed vulnerable workers being pressured into doing things they didn’t want to.

“I think it can create a scenario where vulnerable people such as the elderly, the sick, those living with disability or mental health issues, yes, even young people who are currently having suicidal thoughts and feeling the anxiety of being isolated and have become very depressed – I believe they could feel coerced, under duress, feel under pressure to end their lives far, far too soon.”

He said the bill “opens a Pandora’s box”.

“If you normalise the so-called assisted dying, you create a whole lot of situations where it’s OK to take a life.”

Martin had experience with his elderly mother who thought she was a burden on the family and felt she was better off dead.
READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/dominion-post/news/politics/106510733/Helpful-or-harmful-euthanasia-debate-comes-to-Manawat

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Disabilities Commissioner concerned about End of Life Choice bill

By | Recent News

Radio NZ News 17 August 2018
Family First Comment: Yet more legitimate concerns about a flawed and dangerous bill.
“A person under the bill could easily meet the threshold, but could be profoundly affected by things like depression or other factors, there’s no requirement for the physician to consider conditions that might affect the person’s judgement or decision making,” she said. As a result, she feared it would undermine the position of disabled people.”
www.Protect.org.nz

The Disabilities Commissioner says the End of Life Choice Bill is too broad to protect disabled New Zealanders.

The Justice Select Committee has neared the end of a nationwide tour, after hearing 3500 verbal and 35,000 written submissions.

Yesterday, lawyer Julian Gardner and disability advocate Tricia Malowney, who were members of the advisory panel which was convened before Victoria legalised assisted dying for the terminally ill, said https://www.radionz.co.nz/national/programmes/ninetonoon/audio/2018658341/proposed-euthanasia-bill-in-nz-needs-tweaking

New Zealand’s bill needed tweaking.]

Disabilities Commissioner Paula Tesoriero said the Victorian legislation is only for those who have a terminal condition, which is likely to cause your death between six months and in some cases 12 months.

“In New Zealand that’s not the case, there’s no timeframe for a grievous and irremediable medical condition,” she said.

Ms Tesoriero said added safeguards in the legislation were woefully deficient.

“A person under the bill could easily meet the threshold, but could be profoundly affected by things like depression or other factors, there’s no requirement for the physician to consider conditions that might affect the person’s judgement or decision making,” she said.

As a result, she feared it would undermine the position of disabled people.
READ MORE: https://www.radionz.co.nz/news/national/364316/disabilities-commissioner-concerned-about-end-of-life-choice-bill

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No human dignity in killing or being killed

By | Recent News

Stuff co.nz 17 August 2018
Family First Comment: Well said, Carolyn (who also writes for Mercatornet) “‘Finishing people off’ may suit our current individualistic, utilitarian, impatient culture, but it will degrade us all in the end.”
www.Protect.org.nz

To ask ‘Should Kiwis have a right to die with dignity?’ demonstrates exactly what is wrong with the framing of this discussion by euthanasia activists, pollsters and the media.

Of course Kiwis should be able to die in circumstances consistent with their intrinsic human dignity.

The proper question is: Should Kiwis have the legal ‘right’ to be put to death when they are terminally ill – or for any other reason such as severe disability or hopelessness? Is this consistent with human dignity?

The answer is no. To kill oneself is not consistent with human dignity, and neither is it for someone else to kill you. There cannot be a ‘right’ in the proper sense of the term (something essential to human dignity) to have someone end your life, as official euthanasia regimes require.

To define euthanasia as a right is to put upon the state the duty to provide people to kill you. This is an abuse of state power.
And, as with abortion, there will be pressure on doctors who refuse to do this to at least refer people requesting euthanasia to a doctor who will give the lethal injection. There will be pressure on care homes and hospices to allow such terminations despite it going against their own ethos. Those who object will ultimately be forced out of their profession.

Nine years ago today my 78-year-old sister died peacefully after living for more than 50 years with Parkinson’s disease, and after 6 years in rest home/nursing home care. During the last three years she was visited every day and helped with her main meal. The last 8 months she was cared for at home by family members.

The answer to suffering, physical or mental, is affection and good care. This should come first and as far as possible from family and community, supported by institutions.

“Finishing people off” may suit our current individualistic, utilitarian, impatient culture, but it will degrade us all in the end.
READ MORE: https://www.stuff.co.nz/national/106357606/No-human-dignity-in-killing-or-being-killed

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