Monthly Archives

February 2017

Hospitals slap do-not-resuscitate orders on patients without consent

By | Recent News

Stuff co.nz 26 February 2017
Family First Comment: Very very disturbing
“Patients are having do-not-resuscitate orders placed on them without their consent or that of their family.”
Life-ending orders continue to be slapped on unsuspecting hospital patients who doctors think should be left to die.
Patients are having do-not-resuscitate orders placed on them without their consent or that of their family.
Stuff understands there has been one such case in recent weeks at Palmerston North Hospital, where a patient had an order placed on them without their family’s knowledge.
The family did not want to publicly discuss the issue, but were shocked to discover what happened.
MidCentral District Health Board did not respond to questions about the incident.
The same thing happened to Tim Wallace’s mother Juanita at the same hospital in 2010.
“I asked to see her file to see what she was on and they brought out the folder and in the front of it there was a thing they call a ‘green sheet’. As I found out later, the ED doctor had put a non-resuscitation order on her.”
She died about three years after that admission to hospital.
READ MORE: http://www.stuff.co.nz/national/health/89655156/hospitals-slap-donotresuscitate-orders-on-patients-without-consent

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Families rely on Starship hospital's help as a child's death approaches

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NZ Herald 26 February 2017
When Abigail Lameta entered the last months of her short life, her family knew nothing of the palliative care service at the Starship children’s hospital in Auckland.
The Henderson family soon learned that palliative care could help them through their darkest days, with invaluable advice and support to enable care at home.
Abi died in November, nine days before her ninth birthday. She had been diagnosed at 5½ with a rare and incurable brain tumour. She had chemotherapy and radiation therapy and last August, she was brought home to die.
Around this time, the family met Karyn Bycroft, a nurse practitioner who had helped establish the palliative care service at Starship in 1999.
The family was in regular contact with Starship and the home-care nurses of Waitakere Hospital’s palliative care service.
“For three months we had that contact,” said Abi’s grandmother and adopted mother, Lisa Lameta.
“It was only made possible by knowing there’s someone on the end of the phone if we were worried.”
“It meant we could keep Abi at home. She stabilised for quite a while and was really peaceful just being in her own environment. She was surrounded by family and it was easy for people to come and see her when they wanted to.
READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11806927

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Dutch gov’t panel: Doctor who forcibly euthanized elderly woman ‘acted in good faith’

By | Recent News

LifeSiteNews 31 January 2017
Family First Comment: If this is a case of ‘good faith’ euthanasia, then this proves just how wrong it is!
“The woman, who was over 80, had dementia. She had allegedly earlier requested to be euthanized when “the time was right” but in her last days expressed her desire to continue living. Nevertheless, her doctor put a sedative in the patient’s coffee. The doctor then enlisted the help of family members to hold the struggling, objecting patient down so that she could administer the lethal injection.”
Shocking
#rejectassistedsuicide
A Dutch doctor who forcibly euthanized an elderly woman without her consent “acted in good faith,” a euthanasia oversight panel decided when it cleared her of wrongdoing. The chairman of that panel has expressed hope that the case will go to court – not so the doctor can be prosecuted, but so a court can set a precedent on how far doctors may go in such cases.
This particular case was sent to the Regional Review Committee, which oversees the country’s liberal euthanasia regime.
The woman, who was over 80, had dementia. She had allegedly earlier requested to be euthanized when “the time was right” but in her last days expressed her desire to continue living.
Nevertheless, her doctor put a sedative in the patient’s coffee. The doctor then enlisted the help of family members to hold the struggling, objecting patient down so that she could administer the lethal injection.
“I am convinced that the doctor acted in good faith, and we would like to see more clarity on how such cases are handled in the future,” Committee Chairman Jacob Kohnstamm said. Taking the case to court would be “not to punish the doctor, who acted in good faith and did what she had to do, but to get judicial clarity over what powers a doctor has when it comes to the euthanasia of patients suffering from severe dementia.”
Society has “flipped everything completely upside down,” Alex Schadenberg, Executive Director of the Euthanasia Prevention Coalition, told LifeSiteNews. “This is a prime example of another upside down attitude in the culture.”
READ MORE: https://www.lifesitenews.com/news/dutch-govt-panel-hopes-case-of-forced-euthanasia-committed-in-good-faith-ca
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